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Common Myths and Misconceptions About Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric Surgery Myths and Misconceptions

Common Myths and Misconceptions About Bariatric Surgery: Bariatric surgery, also known as weight loss surgery, is a medical procedure that helps people who are obese or severely overweight to lose weight and improve their health. Despite its proven effectiveness, there are still many myths and misconceptions surrounding bariatric surgery. In this blog, we will explore some of the most common myths and debunk them with facts.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is a cosmetic procedure.

Fact: Bariatric surgery is a medical procedure that is performed to treat obesity and related health conditions. It is not a cosmetic procedure and should not be considered as such.

Even though losing weight might significantly improve your appearance, the true advantages of weight loss surgery are lifespan and good health. Weight loss surgery can lessen the effects of all the more than 40 chronic health issues that obesity is associated with.

“After bariatric surgery, nearly 90% of persons with sleep apnea get a complete remission of their condition, and patients with diabetes see lower blood sugar levels and fewer issues connected to their diabetes than those who don’t have the treatment,” claims Dr. Sapan Jain. In fact, up to 80% of Type 2 diabetics who undergo bariatric surgery enter remission, which allows them to quit taking medication since their blood sugar levels return to normal.

Common Myths and Misconceptions About Bariatric Surgery

Myth: Bariatric surgery is dangerous and has a high risk of complications.

Fact: Like any surgical procedure, bariatric surgery does carry some risks. However, the risk of complications is relatively low when the surgery is performed by an experienced surgeon in a reputable hospital or medical centre.

The dangers associated with obesity are typically significantly higher than those associated with bariatric surgery. Studies show huge drops in dangerous conditions including diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease after surgical weight loss, as well as a nearly 90% reduction in premature death from all causes. Although there are dangers associated with every surgery, bariatric treatments are among the safest ones performed today. Bariatric surgery has a lower death rate (0.1%) than typical treatments like gallbladder removals and hip or knee replacements.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is a quick fix for weight loss.

Fact: Bariatric surgery is not a quick fix for weight loss. It is a tool that can help people lose weight and maintain a healthy weight over time. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery must commit to a lifelong change in diet and exercise habits to ensure long-term success.

With weight reduction surgery, you’ll lose weight quickly, but this is just one part of a comprehensive approach to treating obesity. Surgery candidates meet with a dietician in addition to having medical and psychological exams so they can be prepared to make the required lifestyle changes to help their weight reduction stick following surgery. Normally, the entire procedure takes four to six months. The objective is to assist patients in creating long-term, better habits.

You’re likely to gain the weight back in a few years if you don’t alter your connection with food and control your portion sizes.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is only for people who are extremely overweight

 Fact: Bariatric surgery is not just for people who are extremely overweight. It can be an effective treatment option for people with a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or higher, or for those with a BMI of 30 or higher with obesity-related health conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or sleep apnea.

Many individuals mistakenly believe that weight loss surgery is only appropriate for people who are morbidly obese.

According to Dr. Sapan Jain, those who gain the most from surgery aren’t just heavy; they also have concomitant diseases that affect their health and way of life.

As a result, if you have a BMI of 35, are taking medicine for diabetes, high blood pressure, or high blood oxygen levels, getting treatment for sleep apnea, or have chronic low back or knee pain from putting too much pressure on the joints, you may be a candidate for bariatric surgery.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is painful and requires a long recovery time.

Fact: While it is a major surgical procedure, most patients experience minimal pain and discomfort after the surgery. Recovery times vary depending on the type of surgery, but most patients are able to resume normal activities within a few weeks.

Myth: Bariatric surgery is too expensive and not covered by insurance.

Fact: Many insurance companies do cover bariatric surgery, and there are also financing options available to make the procedure more affordable. The cost of the surgery may be offset by the long-term health benefits and potential cost savings associated with improved health.

The dangers associated with obesity are typically significantly higher than those associated with bariatric surgery. Studies show huge drops in dangerous conditions including diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease after surgical weight loss, as well as a nearly 90% reduction in premature death from all causes. Moreover, every procedure involves For patients who haven’t had success with alternative weight loss procedures, many insurance companies do pay weight loss surgery. Plans vary by state as do the operations they’ll cover, but most businesses accept patients for surgical weight loss who satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Having a body mass index (BMI) of 35 or above and a weight-related illness such as diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, or arthritis
  2. A BMI of over 40

Take your weight in kilos and divide it by the square of your height in meters to determine your BMI. If you prefer to use pounds and inches, multiply the result by 703 after dividing your weight in pounds by the square of your height. If your BMI is greater than 30, you are considered obese.

In conclusion, it is important to understand that bariatric surgery is a safe and effective treatment option for people with obesity and related health conditions. By debunking these common myths, we can help people make informed decisions about their health and consider bariatric surgery as a viable option for weight loss and improved health.

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